Category Archives: Training

Meet the Trainers!

Over the past few months, OPNAV N171 has fielded a number of questions abouttraining the recent Operational Stress Control (OSC) training mandate for deploying units and gathered great, tangible feedback. As we make our way around the fleet and to your command, we wanted to take the opportunity to introduce our OSC trainers and answer some of the commonly asked questions.

What is OSC training? Is it new?

Since 2009, stress training has focused on assisting Navy leaders in identifying and applying practical stress navigation tools. Two courses are offered: Navy OSC for Leaders (NAVOSC-Lead) and Deckplate Leader OSC (DPL-OSC). NAV-OSC Lead was designed by warfighters with warfighters in mind, assisting them in assessing individual and unit stress responses while providing tools to help their Sailors better navigate operational stress. While NAVOSC-Lead is targeted for E7 and above, DPL-OSC mirrors this dialogue-led interactive course for mid-level supervisors E4- E6. These courses are a vital part of any command’s efforts to foster a supportive climate, whether preparing for deployment or trying to strengthen readiness and cohesion. As of March 2014, NAVOSC-Lead has been delivered approximately 350 times to 9,000 Sailors, and DPL-OSC has been taught about 320 times to 12,000 Sailors.

How is OSC training delivered?

Both courses are delivered in-person by our Mobile Training Teams (MTTs) at no cost to your command. There are two teams, one based in Norfolk, Va. And the other in San Diego, and each team is comprised of nine individuals. Most of the trainers are Master Training Specialists. The team is mainly comprised of retired military, representing a mix of warfare communities and services, including a retired Army drill sergeant who also happens to be a Navy spouse. The former ranks of these trainers include everything from junior enlisted to chief petty officer.  Combined, the MTTs have a total of 405 years of military experience!

Where is the training held?

Our MTTs know first-hand the stress of being in the Navy and are flexible with operational demands. MTTs travel to you, whether underway or ashore, CONUS or OCONUS, and can work within available training spaces.

How long will training take?

For a unit of 350 Sailors, with proper space and 4-6 MTTs available, training can be completed within 1-2 days. Each course is designed to take about 3-4 hours, with class sizes maxing out at 35 for NAVOSC-Lead and 50 for DPL- OSC.

How should my unit prepare for the training?

The best preparation for OSC training is to attend with an open mind. The training centers around frank discussion among attendees. When leaders talk about what they see as stress-related issues and how course tools could be applied in their commands, OSC becomes more than a concept – it becomes a way of doing business every day. For more information, see the OSC MTT fact sheet. 

How do you schedule training?

MTTs will prioritize scheduling OSC training with all deploying commands to meet the six-month objective mandated in NAVADMIN 262/13.  Commands are then responsible for documenting completion of training in the Fleet Training Management and Planning System (FLTMPS) prior to deployment.

For specific questions, or to schedule OSC training at your command, you can reach our MTTs as follows:

MTT West at (619) 556-6640, or via email at oscmttwest@navy.mil

MTT East at (757) 445-7353, or via email at oscmtteast@navy.mil

Last, and certainly not least, we are excited to announce that we have begun to launch our OSC web site! As we continue to populate the site with static, program-specific information, such as the history of OSC, the Principles of Resilience, Five Core Leader Functions, etc., we will continue to use this blog to provide you with the tools and resources to apply OSC skills to thrive, not just survive, in both your Navy career and personal lives.

Shipmates taking care of shipmates

By: CAPT Kurt Scott

Earlier this month, the world remembered a tragic day in American history — October 12, 2000 — the bombing of the USS Cole (DDG-67). Remembering that day made me reflect on how our world has changed and yet how some things remain steady; like the commitment of shipmates to each other which has never wavered.

Petty Officer 1st Class Daren Jones, Operations Specialist on the USS Cole at the time of the attack, shared his experiences. “I was scared just like everyone else [but] your training kicks in. Everyone acted with the same amount of bravery, the same amount of courage, the same amount of determination. It was amazing.”

Like the training that propelled the USS Cole crew to perform in a time of high-stress and uncertainty, Operational Stress Control (OSC) skills training facilitates conversations about stress awareness and strategies for stress navigation in both oneself and their shipmates.  It’s about having the ‘tools in the toolbox’ for those unexpected moments in both your Navy career and personal life.

Training, while it may feel cumbersome at times, is what keeps our ships and shipmates operating safely in rough seas and calm waters. The recently released NAVADMIN 262/13 requires OSC skills training within six months of deployment after January 1, 2014. MANY commands have already incorporated stress navigation training and tools into their deployments… and have reported great results!

In May 2013, the USS Stout (DDG-55) completed OSC skills training. Now, after more than two months at sea, Shipmates continue to THRIVE with Skipper, CDR Alpigini, reporting “we’re keeping everyone active and being creative about building resilience.  Most importantly, the team has the skills to identify problems amongst each other and knows how to direct Sailors to the right resources like Chaps, Doc, XO, CO, etc.” Learn about Stout’s creative approaches to stress navigation on its Facebook page.

A recent Navy News Service story highlighted the successes aboard the USS Boxer (LHD- 4) where its leadership worked to implement elements of an OSC program. BRAVO ZULU to the crew for recognizing the importance of stress navigation and taking on its very own local initiative, conducted in parallel with the OSC skills training mandate, to leverage local resources and execute the fundamental steps of a successful OSC program. Check out its Facebook page to follow their journey!

Many more ships throughout the fleet have reaped the benefits of OSC skills training over the past several years, and the sky is the limit. How has OSC training impacted your ship?

New training on the horizon!

Did you read the recent NAVADMIN message regarding updated versions of the Petty Officer Selectee Leadership courses? Great changes are on the horizon, and of course, we at N171 could not be more excited!

NAVADMIN 207/13, released on 28 AUG, shared the incorporation of Operational Stress Control (OSC) and Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) modules as mandatory instruction to newly selected E-4 to E-6 petty officers. Courses affected include: Petty Officer Selectee Leadership Course (POSLC), Petty Officer Second Class Selectee Leadership Course (PO2SLC), and Petty Officer First Class Selectee (PO1SLC) Leadership Course.

“The incorporation of these modules is a terrific accomplishment for our Navy,” commented CAPT Kurt Scott, N171 Resilience Chief. “It’s our perfect opportunity to encourage healthy behaviors and decision-making that our young leaders can emulate throughout the Fleet and within their own families.”

The updated courses are available for viewing and download on Navy Knowledge Online (NKO).

For more information about the Navy’s Center for Personal and Professional Development (CPPD), visit https://www.netc.navy.mil/centers/cppd.

OSC Mobile Training Teams Mark Program Milestones

The Navy’s Operational Stress Control (OSC) Program surpassed a milestone Aug. 10 with completion of the 100th presentation of the Navy Operational Stress Control Leader Course (NAVOSC-LEAD) at NTC Great Lakes, Il. The courses were also provided OCONUS by the OSC Mobile Training Team East during their trips to Guantanamo Bay; Rota, Spain; and Bahrain.

The MTTs deliver both the Navy OSC Leader Course and the Front Line Supervisors Training (FLST) to enhance leaders’ ability to help Sailors and their families better navigate the stresses of Navy life.  The focus on prevention and positive action is designed to help leaders intervene to help shipmates and their families build and maintain wellness.

Navy Operational Stress Control for Leaders Completes 100th Class

http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=68950

To schedule training at no cost to your command contact the OSC MTT lead trainers today at:

MTT West – Mr. Ernest Jackson (619) 556-7215 or via email at ernest.s.jackson.ctr(AT)navy.mil

MTT East – Mr. Daniel Danner at (757) 445-7353 ext 1035 or via email at daniel.danner.ctr(AT)navy.mil

For more details on scheduling training for your command reference NAVADMIN 150/12.

http://www.public.navy.mil/bupers-npc/reference/messages/Documents/NAVADMINS/NAV2012/NAV12150.txt 

USS Truman and USS Stennis Leaders Use OSC Mobile Training Teams to Improve Mission Readiness

OSC Team aboard the USS STENNIS (CV 74). From left; Mr. Ernest Jackson; Ms. Leanne Braddock; Mr. Daryl Charles; Mr. David Oakey

Recently, two afloat commands took advantage of the OSC Mobile Training Teams’ delivery of two courses that provide the practical tools and information necessary to help their Sailors prepare for the challenges of Navy Life.

In April, the East coast Team delivered the training to its first aircraft carrier, the USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) to Sailors in preparation for their workup cycle and the ship’s return to the  Fleet.  See  Truman Sailors Receive Operational Stress Control Training – Navy.mil .  In June, the West Coast team delivered  training for six days, while underway, aboard the USS Stennis (CVN 74).

The MTTs deliver both the Navy Operational Stress Control Leader course and Front Line Supervisor Training to help build the long-term health of Sailors. See Stennis Sailors manage operational stress

To schedule training at no cost to your command contact the OSC MTT lead trainers today at:

MTT West – Mr. Ernest Jackson (619) 556-7215 or via email at ernest.s.jackson.ctr(AT)navy.mil

MTT East – Mr. Daniel Danner at (757) 445-7353 ext 1035 or via email at daniel.danner.ctr(AT)navy.mil

For more details on scheduling training for your command reference NAVADMIN 150/12.

http://www.public.navy.mil/bupers-npc/reference/messages/Documents/NAVADMINS/NAV2012/NAV12150.txt