Meet the Trainers!

Over the past few months, OPNAV N171 has fielded a number of questions abouttraining the recent Operational Stress Control (OSC) training mandate for deploying units and gathered great, tangible feedback. As we make our way around the fleet and to your command, we wanted to take the opportunity to introduce our OSC trainers and answer some of the commonly asked questions.

What is OSC training? Is it new?

Since 2009, stress training has focused on assisting Navy leaders in identifying and applying practical stress navigation tools. Two courses are offered: Navy OSC for Leaders (NAVOSC-Lead) and Deckplate Leader OSC (DPL-OSC). NAV-OSC Lead was designed by warfighters with warfighters in mind, assisting them in assessing individual and unit stress responses while providing tools to help their Sailors better navigate operational stress. While NAVOSC-Lead is targeted for E7 and above, DPL-OSC mirrors this dialogue-led interactive course for mid-level supervisors E4- E6. These courses are a vital part of any command’s efforts to foster a supportive climate, whether preparing for deployment or trying to strengthen readiness and cohesion. As of March 2014, NAVOSC-Lead has been delivered approximately 350 times to 9,000 Sailors, and DPL-OSC has been taught about 320 times to 12,000 Sailors.

How is OSC training delivered?

Both courses are delivered in-person by our Mobile Training Teams (MTTs) at no cost to your command. There are two teams, one based in Norfolk, Va. And the other in San Diego, and each team is comprised of nine individuals. Most of the trainers are Master Training Specialists. The team is mainly comprised of retired military, representing a mix of warfare communities and services, including a retired Army drill sergeant who also happens to be a Navy spouse. The former ranks of these trainers include everything from junior enlisted to chief petty officer.  Combined, the MTTs have a total of 405 years of military experience!

Where is the training held?

Our MTTs know first-hand the stress of being in the Navy and are flexible with operational demands. MTTs travel to you, whether underway or ashore, CONUS or OCONUS, and can work within available training spaces.

How long will training take?

For a unit of 350 Sailors, with proper space and 4-6 MTTs available, training can be completed within 1-2 days. Each course is designed to take about 3-4 hours, with class sizes maxing out at 35 for NAVOSC-Lead and 50 for DPL- OSC.

How should my unit prepare for the training?

The best preparation for OSC training is to attend with an open mind. The training centers around frank discussion among attendees. When leaders talk about what they see as stress-related issues and how course tools could be applied in their commands, OSC becomes more than a concept – it becomes a way of doing business every day. For more information, see the OSC MTT fact sheet. 

How do you schedule training?

MTTs will prioritize scheduling OSC training with all deploying commands to meet the six-month objective mandated in NAVADMIN 262/13.  Commands are then responsible for documenting completion of training in the Fleet Training Management and Planning System (FLTMPS) prior to deployment.

For specific questions, or to schedule OSC training at your command, you can reach our MTTs as follows:

MTT West at (619) 556-6640, or via email at oscmttwest@navy.mil

MTT East at (757) 445-7353, or via email at oscmtteast@navy.mil

Last, and certainly not least, we are excited to announce that we have begun to launch our OSC web site! As we continue to populate the site with static, program-specific information, such as the history of OSC, the Principles of Resilience, Five Core Leader Functions, etc., we will continue to use this blog to provide you with the tools and resources to apply OSC skills to thrive, not just survive, in both your Navy career and personal lives.

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