Joining Forces to Strengthen Resilience


(Video link)

As we have written about previously, the 2012 Navy and Marine Corps Combat and Operational Stress Control Conference took place in San Diego this past 23rd and 24th of May.

We are excited to announce the conference plenary session videos and audio recordings of breakout sessions with corresponding PowerPoint presentations are now available for viewing at:

http://www.med.navy.mil/SITES/NMCSD/NCCOSC/COSCCONFERENCEV2/2012/LIVELEARNINGCENTER/Pages/default.aspx

The below Navy NewsStand article highlights many different aspects of the conference which included tracks for Navy and Marine Corps leaders, researchers, clinicians, and families.

For more information on the conference visit the Naval Center for Combat and Operational Stress control website: www.NCCOSC.navy.mil or find them on Facebook and share your conference feedback.

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http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=67390

Resilient Sailors Keep Fleet Moving
Story Number: NNS120525-06
5/25/2012
By Chief Mass Communication Specialist Maria Yager, Navy Personnel Command Public Affairs

 SAN DIEGO (NNS) — More than 1,500 service members and civilians representing all branches of the military attended the 2012 Navy and Marine Corps Combat and Operational Stress Control (COSC) Conference in San Diego May 23 and 24.



The conference matched operational leaders from the fleet, like Vice Adm. Richard W. Hunt, commander, Naval Surface Forces; and Vice Adm. Gerald Beaman, commander, U.S. 3rd Fleet; with medical and readiness experts including Rear Adm. Elizabeth Niemyer, deputy chief, Wounded, Ill, & Injured, Bureau of Medicine and Surgery; Capt. Kurt Scott, director, Behavioral Health, and Navy medical and readiness researchers. 



“I’m very thankful for the opportunity to be able to be here at this conference. I think it is very meaningful, very important and is a very strong signal to our Sailors just how much importance we give to this work,” said Hunt. “Being able to develop resilience for our people, giving them the right resources, the right training and education so that they can adjust to the very uncertain environment that we have out there is important.”



The theme, Joining Forces to Strengthen Resilience, was chosen to directly support the 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative which is a set of objectives and policies, new and existing, across a spectrum of wellness that maximizes each Sailor’s and Marine’s personal readiness to hone the most combat effective force in the history of the Department of the Navy.



“Making sure we take care of our people in a very positive way, upfront and early is what is absolutely necessary to make sure we have that continual combat readiness that we need,” said Hunt.



Participants discussed Operational Stress Control (OSC) and the Combat and Operational Stress Continuum. The continuum is a color-coded guide for Sailors and leaders to measure their stress as it relates to one of four zones: ready, reacting, injured or ill. 



According to OSC, stress is a part of everyday life. Used to our advantage stress can move us to higher levels of performance, but too much or extreme stress can have negative consequences. OSC seeks to educate Sailors, Marines, families and command leaders to take care of themselves, to stay fit and healthy, to look out for one another and take action when they see themselves or others reacting negatively to stress. The goal is to prepare 21st Century Sailors and Marines and their families to positively manage the stress.

“The challenges out there change on a daily basis and the more prepared they are with a very rich education and background the better they are to adapt and overcome,” said Hunt. 



OSC and the continuum are concepts applicable to the entire fleet.

 

COSC presenters included Navy Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention Program; Navy Physical Readiness Program; Marine Total Fitness Panel; Navy Personnel Research Studies; Technology, Fleet and Family Support Center; and experts in nutrition, resiliency, sleep studies, behavioral health, suicide prevention and post traumatic stress disorder.



“This is a distinctive event because it is the only one of its kind that brings together such a diverse audience that is singularly united in its passion to help ensure the psychological well-being of our Sailors and Marines,” said Capt. Scott Johnston, director, Naval Center for Combat and Operational Stress Control. “Line leaders will help the medical community to understand the realities of readiness and operational needs. Healthcare providers, in turn, will inform leaders of the best way to identify stress and to mitigate it.”

 

For more information on combat and operational stress control visit www.NCCOSC.navy.mil. 



For more information, visit www.navy.mil, www.facebook.com/usnavy, or www.twitter.com/usnavy.

Related stories:
Military Looks to Boost Ways to Fight Stress – UT San Diego

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